PacIOOS Lecture Series

PacIOOS Lecture Series

unnamed

PacIOOS Lecture Series

The Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) believes that ocean data and information can help save lives. Collecting ocean data on the most recent conditions, forecasting future events and developing new user-friendly tools not only protects the environment but also supports the economy and resources.

In collaboration with a large network of partners, PacIOOS provides valuable data to inform decision-making in Pacific communities. Based within the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawai‘I in Mānoa, PacIOOS is one of 11 regional associations that make up the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System.


Lectures

This three lecture series was held at noon every other Wednesday in June of 2016. Lectures were held in the Waikiki Aquarium classroom for free and were open to the public.

Ocean Observing in the Pacific Islands Region

The “Ocean Observing in the Pacific Islands Region” lecture was held on June 1 at 12 p.m. Participants learned about the the U.S. Pacific Islands, and how PacIOOS helped to fill ocean observation needs to address local challenges at a lecture by Fiona Langenberger, Communications and Program Coordinator with the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS). The lecture presented an overview of ocean observation and forecasting data that collected, managed and served to improve on-the-ground decision making throughout this unique and diverse region.

unnamed


Monitoring Nearshore Water Quality in Hawai‘i

The “Monitoring Near shore Water Quality in Hawai’i” Lecture was held on June 15 at 12 p.m. Gordon Walker, oceanographic technician with PacIOOS’ Near Shore Water Quality Group, addressed how to identify and measure interactions between water coming from land and the near shore ocean environment. Seven sensors continue to provide timely data to monitor changes in coastal waters, and provide early warning of polluted runoff, sewing spills and more. Participants found out about the information that the team collects and learned how to read this data.

unnamed-1


Tracking Hawai‘i’s Sharks

The “Tracking Hawai’i Sharks” Lecture was held on June 29 at 12 p.m. Mark Royer & Danny Coffey, graduate students from the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology Shark Research Group, provided insights into the cutting-edge technology being used to examine the behavioral ecology and physiology of tiger sharks, scalloped hammerhead sharks and Bluntnose Sixgill sharks (a deep sea shark). Participants learned how oxygen sensors, satellite tags and other technology helped to reveal new information about these fascinating animals.

unnamed-1